Perpetrator Studies Network

Books

State of Repression: Iraq under Saddam Hussein

By Lisa Blaydes. A new account of modern Iraqi politics that overturns the conventional wisdom about its sectarian divisions. How did Iraq become one of the most repressive dictatorships of the late twentieth century? The conventional wisdom about Iraq’s modern political history is that the country was doomed by its diverse social fabric. But in State…

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Sporadically Radical: Ethnographies of Organized Violence and Militant Mobilization

Edited by Henrik Vigh and Steffen Jensen. What makes young men willing to risk their lives by enrolling in violent organizations? How do these organizations persuade young men to do so? In the age of radicalization, these questions are central to most debates about politics and globalization. Through long-term ethnographic fieldwork in various conflict settings,…

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GSP: Images And Collective Violence: Function, Use And Memory

A new issue of Genocide Studies and Prevention is out, with contributions of network members. Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal (GSP) is the official journal of The International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS). IAGS is a global, interdisciplinary, non-partisan organization that seeks to further research and teaching about the nature, causes, and consequences of genocide,…

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Reckonings: Legacies of Nazi Persecution and the Quest for Justice

By Mary Fulbrook. A single word—”Auschwitz”—is sometimes used to encapsulate the totality of persecution and suffering involved in what we call the Holocaust. Yet focusing on a single concentration camp, however horrific the scale of crimes committed there, leaves an incomplete story, truncates a complex history and obscures the continuing legacies of Nazi crimes. Mary…

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Rwanda After Genocide: Gender, Identity and Post-Traumatic Growth

By Caroline Williamson Sinalo. In the 1994 Rwanda genocide, around 1 million people were brutally murdered in just thirteen weeks. This book offers an in-depth study of posttraumatic growth in the testimonies of the men and women who survived, highlighting the ways in which they were able to build a new, and often enhanced, way…

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Propaganda and the Genocide in Indonesia: Imagined Evil

By Saskia E. Wieringa and Nursyahbani Katjasungkana. In Indonesia, the events of 1st October 1965 were followed by a campaign to annihilate the Communist Party and its alleged sympathisers. It resulted in the murder of an estimate of one million people – a genocide that counts as one of the largest mass murders after WWII – and…

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Perpetrating Selves: Doing Violence, Performing Identity

By Clare Bielby and Jeffrey Stevenson Murer. This volume explores violent perpetration in diverse forms from an interdisciplinary and transnational perspective. From National Socialist perpetration in the museum, through post-terrorist life writing to embodied performances of perpetration in cosplay, the collection draws upon a series of historical and geographical case studies, seen through the lens…

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Understanding Willing Participants: Milgram’s Obedience Experiments and the Holocaust

By Nestar Russell. Horrified by the Holocaust, social psychologist Stanley Milgram wondered if he could recreate the Holocaust in the laboratory setting. Unabated for more than half a century, his (in)famous results have continued to intrigue scholars. Based on unpublished archival data from Milgram’s personal collection, volume one of this two-volume set introduces readers to…

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Talaat Pasha: Father of Modern Turkey, Architect of Genocide

By Hans-Lukas Kieser. Talaat Pasha (1874–1921) led the triumvirate that ruled the late Ottoman Empire during World War I and is arguably the father of modern Turkey. He was also the architect of the Armenian Genocide, which would result in the systematic extermination of more than a million people, and which set the stage for a…

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The Rise of Organised Brutality. A Historical Sociology of Violence

By Siniša Malešević. Challenging the prevailing belief that organised violence is experiencing historically continuous decline, this book provides an in-depth sociological analysis that shows organised violence is, in fact, on the rise. Malešević demonstrates that violence is determined by organisational capacity, ideological penetration and micro-solidarity, rather than biological tendencies, meaning that despite pre-modern societies being exposed…

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