Perpetrator Studies Network

Books

Perpetrators: Encountering Humanity’s Dark Side

By Antonius C.G.M. Robben and Alexander Laban Hinton. Perpetrators of mass violence are commonly regarded as evil. Their violent nature is believed to make them commit heinous crimes as members of state agencies, insurgencies, terrorist organizations, or racist and supremacist groups. Upon close examination, however, perpetrators are contradictory human beings who often lead unsettlingly ordinary…

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Perpetrator Disgust: The Moral Limits of Gut Feelings

By Ditte Marie Munch-Jurisic. What is the significance of our gut feelings? In this volume, Munch-Jurisic considers this question through the phenomenon of perpetrator disgust. Across time and cultures, individuals who have committed atrocities have been known to exhibit severe emotional and physical distress during the act of violence or upon recalling it, with symptoms…

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A Summer of Mass Murder: 1941 Rehearsal for the Hungarian Holocaust

By George Eisen. Most accounts of the Holocaust focus on trainloads of prisoners speeding toward Auschwitz, with its chimneys belching smoke and flames, in the summer of 1944. This book provides a hitherto untold chapter of the Holocaust by exploring a prequel to the gas chambers: the face-to-face mass murder of Jews in Galicia by…

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Photography, Bearing Witness and the Yugoslav Wars, 1988-2021: Testimonies of Light

By Paul Lowe. Combining case studies with theoretical and philosophical insights, this book explores the role of photography in representing conflict and genocide, both during and after the break-up of Yugoslavia. Concentrating on the photographer, this book considers the practice of photojournalism rather than simply in terms of its consumption and use by the media….

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A Troubled Sleep: Risk and Resilience in Contemporary Northern Ireland

By James Waller. In contemporary Northern Ireland, more than two decades after the peace agreement that ended the thirty-year sectarian violence known as “the Troubles” the risk of a return to violent conflict is not only present but growing. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, comparative research, and over 110 hours of face-to-face interviews with a diverse…

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A Transnational History of Right-Wing Terrorism: Political Violence and the Far Right in Eastern and Western Europe since 1900

Edited by Johannes Dafinger and Moritz Florin.  A Transnational History of Right-Wing Terrorism offers new insights into the history of right-wing extremism and violence in Europe, East and West, from 1900 until the present day. It is the first book to take such a broad historical approach to the topic. The book explores the transnational dimension of…

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On Screen and Off: Cinema and the Making of Nazi Hamburg

By Anne Berg. On Screen and Off shows that the making of Nazism was a local affair and the Nazi city a product of more than models and plans emanating from Berlin. In Hamburg, film was key in turning this self-styled “Gateway to the World” into a “Nazi city.” The Nazi regime imagined film as a powerful…

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Ghosts of War: Nazi Occupation and Its Aftermath in Soviet Belarus

By Franziska Exeler. How do states and societies confront the legacies of war and occupation, and what do truth, guilt, and justice mean in that process? In Ghosts of War, Franziska Exeler examines people’s wartime choices and their aftermath in Belarus, a war-ravaged Soviet republic that was under Nazi occupation during the Second World War….

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Revisiting Modernity and the Holocaust: Heritage, Dilemmas, Extensions

Edited by Jack Palmer and Dariusz Brzeziński. Zygmunt Bauman’s Modernity and the Holocaust is a decisive text of intellectual reflection after Auschwitz, in which Bauman rejected the idea that the Holocaust represented the polar opposite of modernity and saw it instead as its dark potentiality. Bringing together leading scholars from across disciplines, this volume offers the…

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Political Memory and the Aesthetics of Care: The Art of Complicity and Resistance

By Mihaela Mihai. With this nuanced and interdisciplinary work, political theorist Mihaela Mihai tackles several interrelated questions: How do societies remember histories of systemic violence? Who is excluded from such histories’ cast of characters? And what are the political costs of selective remembering in the present? Building on insights from political theory, social epistemology, and…

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