Perpetrator Studies Network

Books

Writing Violence: The Politics of Form in Early Modern Japanese Literature

By David C. Atherton. Edo-period Japan was a golden age for commercial literature. A host of new narrative genres cast their gaze across the social landscape, probed the realms of history and the fantastic, and breathed new life into literary tradition. But how to understand the politics of this body of literature remains contested, in part…

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Täterforschung nach Auschwitz: John Steiners Untersuchungen

Edited by Anne and Jochen Fahrenberg. John Michael Steiner war ein tschechisch-amerikanischer Soziologe. Er wurde 1925 in einer deutschsprachigen Familie in Prag geboren und, noch als Schüler, im Jahr 1942 inhaftiert und wie seine Eltern in Konzentrationslager gebracht: Theresienstadt, dann Auschwitz-Birkenau und Außenlager Blechhammer. Seine drastischen Erfahrungsberichte “Sklavenarbeit in der Fabrik für synthetisches Benzin Blechhammer”;…

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Violence After Stalin: Institutions, Practices, and Everyday Life in the Soviet Bloc 1953–1989

Edited by Jan Claas Behrends, Thomas Lindenberger, and Pavel Kolář. This volume by an international group of historians presents case studies on the use and types of physical violence in the USSR and Moscow’s European satellite states after the death of Joseph Stalin. While communist rule until 1953 was characterized by repression and mass-terror, violence…

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Génocidaire(s): au coeur de la justice internationale pénale

By Damien Scalia. This book draws on unique materials – about sixty interviews Scalia conducted with some of the most serious criminals tried by international criminal courts. In his encounters with these génocidaires, the author listened to them for a long time, not to study how they became perpetrators, as is generally the case in…

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Tarnished Heroes: The Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists in the Memory Politics of Post-Soviet Ukraine

By Per A. Rudling. Following its declaration of independence in 1991, Ukraine has sought to produce a new national history. After the 2004 Orange Revolution, newly elected president Viktor Yushchenko embarked on an ambitious project to rehabilitate the most radical branch of the far-right interwar and wartime Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its armed…

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Fascism and Genocide: Russia’s War Against Ukrainians

By Taras Kuzio and Stefan Jajecznyk-Kelman. This book details how Russia’s February 2022 open invasion of Ukraine has led to the biggest military conflagration and refugee crisis in Europe since World War II—a development with global ramifications. Co-written by a leading Western political expert, with three decades of research on contemporary Ukraine, and a prolific…

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Anthropological Witness: Lessons from the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

By Alexander Laban Hinton. Anthropological Witness tells the story of Alexander Laban Hinton’s encounter with an accused architect of genocide and, more broadly, Hinton’s attempt to navigate the promises and perils of expert testimony. In March 2016, Hinton served as an expert witness at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, an international tribunal established to…

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Abolitionist Intimacies

By El Jones. In Abolitionist Intimacies, El Jones examines the movement to abolish prisons through the Black feminist principles of care and collectivity. Understanding the history of prisons in Canada in their relationship to settler colonialism and anti-Black racism, Jones observes how practices of intimacy become imbued with state violence at carceral sites including prisons,…

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World War II as an Identity Project: Historicism, Legitimacy Contests, and the (Re-)Construction of Political Communities in Ukraine, 1939–1946

By Oleksandr Melnyk. This book explores the relationship between history, legitimacy, and violence in the building and breaking of nations and states on the territory of contemporary Ukraine during the Second World War and in its aftermath. At its center are various institutions of the Soviet state. Other states and rival political movements also enter…

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Never Again: Germans and Genocide after the Holocaust

By Andrew I. Port. Germans remember the Nazi past so that it may never happen again. But how has the abstract vow to remember translated into concrete action to prevent new genocides abroad? As reports of mass killings in Bosnia spread in the middle of 1995, Germans faced a dilemma. Should the Federal Republic deploy…

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