Perpetrator Studies Network

Books

German Women’s Life Writing and the Holocaust: Complicity and Gender in the Second World War

By Elisabeth Kimmer. This important study examines women’s life writing about the Second World War and the Holocaust, such as memoirs, diaries, docunovels, and autobiographically inspired fiction. Through a historical and literary study of the complex relationship between gender, genocide, and female agency, the analyzes correct androcentric views of the Second World War and seek…

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The Politics of Mass Violence in the Middle East

By Laura Robson. The Middle East today is characterized by an astonishingly bloody civil war in Syria, an ever more highly racialized and militarized approach to the concept of a Jewish state in Israel and the Palestinian territories, an Iraqi state paralyzed by the emergence of class- and region-inflected sectarian identifications, a Lebanon teetering on…

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Harmful and Undesirable: Book Censorship in Nazi Germany

By Guenter Lewy. Like every totalitarian regime, Nazi Germany tried to control intellectual freedom through book censorship. Between 1933 and 1945, the Hitler regime orchestrated a massive campaign to take control of all forms of communication. In 1933 alone, there were 90 book burnings across 70 German cities, declared by a Ministry of Propaganda official…

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Paramilitarism: Mass Violence in the Shadow of the State

By Ugur Ümit Üngör. From the deserts of Sudan to the jungles of Colombia, and from the streets of Belfast to the mountains of Kurdistan, paramilitaries have appeared in violent conflicts in very different settings. Paramilitaries are generally depicted as irregular armed organizations that carry out acts of violence against civilians on behalf of a…

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Debates on Colonial Genocide in the 21st Century

By Marouf  Hasian Jr. This book analyses the debates on colonial genocide in the 21st century and introduces cases where states are reluctant to acknowledge genocides. The author departs from traditional studies of the work of Raphael Lemkin or U.N. definitions of genocide so that readers can examine genocide recognition as a political act that…

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Steeped in the Blood of Racism: Black Power, Law and Order, and the 1970 Shootings at Jackson State College

By Nancy K. Bristow. Steeped in the Blood of Racism explores the essential role of white supremacy in causing the shootings and shaping the aftermath. By 1970, even historically conservative campuses such as Jackson State, where an all-white Board of Trustees of Institutions of Higher Learning had long exercised its power to control student behavior,…

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Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Edited by Carsten Stahn, Carmel Agius, Serge Brammertz, and Colleen Rohan. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) is one the pioneering experiments in international criminal justice. It has left a rich legal, institutional, and non-judicial legacy. This edited collection provides a broad perspective on the contribution of the tribunal to law, memory, and justice. It explores…

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Visualizing Fascism: The Twentieth-Century Rise of the Global Right

Edited by Julia Adeney Thomas and Geoff Eley. Visualizing Fascism argues that fascism was not merely a domestic menace in a few European nations, but arose as a genuinely global phenomenon in the early twentieth century. Contributors use visual materials to explore fascism’s populist appeal in settings around the world, including China, Japan, South Africa, Slovakia,…

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Enacting History: A Practical Guide to Teaching the Holocaust through Theater

By Mira Hirsch, Janet E. Rubin, and Arnold Mittelman. Enacting History is a practical guide for educators that provides methodologies and resources for teaching the Holocaust through a variety of theatrical means, including scripted texts, verbatim testimony, devised theater techniques and process-oriented creative exercises. A close collaboration with the USC Shoah Foundation I Witness program and the National…

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The End of the Ottomans: The Genocide of 1915 and the Politics of Turkish Nationalism

Edited by Hans-Lukas Kieser, Margaret Lavinia Anderson, Seyhan Bayraktar, and Thomas Schmutz. In the early part of the twentieth century, as Europe began its descent into the First World War, the Ottoman world – once the largest Empire in the Middle East – began to experience a revolution which would culminate in the new, secular Turkish state. Alongside…

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