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After Nuremberg: Exploring Multiple Dimensions of the Acceptance of International Criminal Justice

Edited by Susanne Buckley-Zistel, Friederike Mieth and Marjana Papa

This is an all-online edited volume. In lieu of a blurb here is an excerpt from the introduction:

“Following World War II, a number of Germans responsible for heinous crimes were taken to court in the city of Nuremberg. In total, 22 people were tried by judges from the Allied powers who presided over the hearings: Great Brittan, France, the United States of America, and the Soviet Union. The Nuremberg trials were the first time that justice was rendered by agents from outside a country for crimes committed by officials from within that country. In other words, Nuremberg was the first case of the application of international criminal justice in a situation country; in fact it led to the development of the very norms – the Nuremberg Principles – on which international criminal justice is based today. Even though this form of justice was initially appreciated or at least accepted by large parts of the population, sentiments changed over time as an increasing number of Germans were directly or indirectly affected by external transitional justice measures (Weinke, 2011). Nuremberg thus presents an interesting case study of whether and, if so, how international criminal justice is accepted in a situation country. This question is central to this publication, and the research project from which it stems, which seeks to investigate how international criminal justice in the form of trials and tribunals is accepted by people who live in the countries in which the crimes were committed.”

Contents:

  1. After Nuremberg. Exploring Multiple Dimensions of the Acceptance of International Criminal Justice: An Introduction
  2. Acceptance of International Criminal Justice: A Review
  3. Methodology
  4. Acceptance of International Criminal Justice in Situation Countries. 10 Key Findings
  5. Acceptance of International Criminal Justice: Country Study on Colombia
  6. Acceptance of International Criminal Justice through Fragmented Domestication: The Case of Kosovo
  7. Acceptance of International Criminal Justice in Nigeria: Legal Compliance, Myth or Reality?
  8. Assessing the Political Acceptance of Hybrid Courts in Fractured States: The Case of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon
  9. Understanding Acceptance of International Justice through Duch’s Sentence at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia
  10. ‘Changing Faces’ on Acceptance of International Criminal Intervention in Kenya
  11. Between Interests and Values: Ukraine’s Contingent Acceptance of International Criminal Justice
  12. Prosecution that Never Began: An Exploration of Acceptance of International Criminal Justice in Nigeria
  13. Unfinished Business: Acceptance of International Criminal Justice in Ukraine
  14. ‘Two-Faced’ Acceptance of International Criminal Justice Accountability Mechanisms by Actors in the Northern Uganda Armed Conflict
  15. Prosecuting the Khmer Rouge: Views from the Inside
  16. Acceptance of the International Criminal Court in Côte d’Ivoire: Between the Hope for Justice and the Concern of ‘Victor’s Justice’
  17. Acceptance of International Criminal Justice and the Path to the International Criminal Court in Palestine
  18. Frames of Acceptance of International Criminal Justice in Serbia
  19. Layered Justice: Assessing the Acceptance of the Multiple International Criminal Justice Mechanisms in Post-War Kosovo
  20. Changing Patterns of Acceptance. International Criminal Justice after the Rwandan Genocide

For access to PDFs of all of the chapters click here.